- Troy, NY USA

Center for Computational Innovations

Rensselaer at Petascale

Solving problems for next generation basic and applied science and engineering research through the use of massively parallel computation and data analytics.

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Troy, N.Y. — Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute will combine decades of expertise to help American industry and businesses expand use of high performance computing (HPC) under a recently signed memorandum of understanding.

“It’s well recognized that HPC is key to accelerating technological innovation and to fueling a nation’s economic vitality,” says Fred Streitz, director of LLNL’s High Performance Computing Innovation Center (HPCIC), which facilitates computational engagements with industry. “Our long, fruitful history of collaboration and joint scientific and technological discovery with RPI is a natural platform on which to build opportunities for companies to advance through the use of HPC.”

Livermore and Rensselaer will look to bridge the gap between the levels of computing conducted at their institutions and the typical levels found in industry. Scientific and engineering software applications capable of running on HPC platforms are a prime area of interest.

New “Balanced” Supercomputing System at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute—the Most Powerful University-Based Supercomputer in New York State and the Northeast—Positions the University for Continued Leadership and Impact in Massively Parallel Computational and Data Analytics Research, Innovation, and Education

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute today unveiled a new petascale supercomputing system, the Advanced Multiprocessing Optimized System, or AMOS.

With the ability to perform more than one quadrillion (1015) calculations per second, AMOS is the most powerful university-based supercomputer in New York state and the Northeast, and among the most powerful in the world. In addition to massive computational power, AMOS has high-performance networking capabilities with a bandwidth of more than four terabytes per second—more than the combined bandwidth of 2 million home Internet subscribers.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Professor and Council co-Chair of the international Research Data Alliance Francine Berman joined with Google Vice President Vint Cerf to discuss the future of public access to research data in a Science magazine Op Ed appearing Aug 9. “Who Will Pay for Public Access to Research Data?” appears in the Policy Forum section of Science – a publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science – and discusses the growing call for greater public access to data resulting from taxpayer sponsored research.

News

In The Media

  • Inner Workings: Smart-sensor network keeps close eye on lake ecosystem

    February 2, 2018 -

    New York’s Lake George may be the most high-tech lake in the world. By year’s end, a network of 41 sensor platforms will monitor the 32-mile long body of water. Its tributary stations and vertical profilers measure the chemical and physical properties of water at varying depths. Acoustic sensors measure the direction and speed of currents in three dimensions. What’s known as the Jefferson Project, named after US President Thomas Jefferson who once marveled at the lake during a visit, is run by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) in Troy, NY. Started three years ago, the project is already collecting more data points in one week than Rensselaer researchers collected at the lake over the past three decades, says project leader Rick Relyea.

  • The Remarkable Career of Shirley Ann Jackson

    December 21, 2017 - Shirley Ann Jackson worked to help bring about more diversity at MIT, where she was the first African-American woman to earn a doctorate. She then applied her mix of vision and pragmatism in the lab, in Washington, and at the helm of a major research university.
  • The Internet of Things Needs a Code of Ethics

    July 6, 2017 -

    In October, when malware called Mirai took over poorly secured webcams and DVRs, and used them to disrupt internet access across the United States, I wondered who was responsible. Not who actually coded the malware, or who unleashed it on an essential piece of the internet’s infrastructure—instead, I wanted to know if anybody could be held legally responsible. Could the unsecure devices’ manufacturers be liable for the damage their products?

    Right now, in this early stage of connected devices’ slow invasion into our daily lives, there’s no clear answer to that question. That’s because there’s no real legal framework that would hold manufacturers responsible for critical failures that harm others. As is often the case, the technology has developed far faster than policies and regulations.

    But it’s not just the legal system that’s out of touch with the new, connected reality. The Internet of Things, as it’s called, is also lacking a critical ethical framework, argues Francine Berman, a computer-science professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a longtime expert on computer infrastructure. Together with Vint Cerf, an engineer considered one of the fathers of the internet, Berman wrote an article in the journal Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery about the need for an ethical system.

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